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Jacob O. Layer DMD, PC April 2017 Newsletter
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Times You Need to Replace Your Toothbrush
There are going to be multiple times where you need to change your toothbrush since it isn't sanitary for you to use the same toothbrush all the time. Toothbrushes also become frayed and less effective at cleaning your teeth if you do not replace them frequently enough. Here are some of main reasons you should replace your toothbrush:

When Cold Sores Flare Up
If you tend to get chronic cold sores, then you want to keep a lot of extra toothbrushes on hand. When you get a new flare up, you should change to a new toothbrush. This helps you avoid repeated contact with the virus when it remains on old bristles or handles, which could cause another flare up.

When You Get Sick
If you are already sick, you probably will not become reinfected by your own germs on a toothbrush, but your toothbrush is still an environment prone to carrying those germs. If you store your toothbrush close to other toothbrushes, such as your family's, your germs may be able to transfer to their toothbrush. Replacing your toothbrush is one way you can help reduce the risk of other people in your home getting sick.

After Three Months
Even if you haven't been sick or had a cold sore, if you have hit the three-month mark, you need to change out your toothbrush. It's not a good idea to use them longer than that. They won't brush your teeth as effectively, which can hurt your dental health in the long-run.

Why You Do Not Treat a Toothache with Aspirin
When you have a toothache, the first thing you need to do is consult a dentist. However, until your appointment, it is important that you treat the pain. Using an over-the-counter pain reliever is a good idea, but be careful about how you use aspirin to treat a toothache.

If you look up treatments for tooth pain, you may see a recommendation to put crushed aspirin directly on the tooth, but using aspirin directly on a toothache can end up leaving you in more pain. If you were to do this, you may burn your gums due to the acidic ingredients in aspirin and cause more mouth pain. When using over-the-counter pain medication to treat tooth pain, be sure to use them as instructed.

How Does Gum Disease Affect Diabetes?
Did you know that there is a link between gum disease and diabetes? This relationship has been well documented, as researchers have found that gum disease is significantly more prevalent in diabetics than it is in non-diabetics. Diabetics also tend to lose more teeth than people who are not living with diabetes.

It is thought that its relationship is due to the fact that people with diabetes are more likely to develop infections. Unfortunately, when a person with diabetes also has gum disease, they can experience a negative impact on their ability to control their condition, making it difficult to regulate their insulin and sugar levels. Therefore, it is essential that dental patients with diabetes get treatment right away for any problems with their gums.

Dr. Jake and his Team would love to hear from you! Got a question? We can help!



Jacob O. Layer DMD, PC | www.layerdental.com | 541-734-0970
1485 East McAndrews Rd., Medford, OR 97504



 

 

 
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